Punjo is not Puna : Not All Solar Panels Are Equal

Nii koi’s wife was pregnant with their third child, and as usual her food cravings seemed to change by the hour. This morning she wanted Pona yams with smoked fish light soup. Being a great husband Nii Koi dashes  to the nearby  grocery down the road  and ends up being sold Punjo yams ,a lower priced ,larger variety of yam. Most Ghanaians prefer the higher sugar content and finer texture in Pona yams even though they can be quite pricey especially when yams are not in season. Thinking he had found a great deal Nii Koi proceeded to complete his assignment.

His wife was very furious, I will not eat this yam

“All yam be yam he exclaimed” and she hissed back, Punjo is not Pona

To cut a long story short his wife refused to eat the Punjo yams and insisted that he get Pona yams to satisfy her cravings

Jinko Solar panels are durable and efficient

Selling Solar in a harsh economic climate like Ghana can be quite challenging ,it’s not unusual for prospective customers to ask questions such as  “why your solar panels cost Ghc X when so and so in the market is selling it for so much less at Ghc. Y.”

The simple answer is – Not All Solar Panels Are Equal.

Punjo is not Puna : Not All Solar Panels Are Equal

So when you compare prices for solar panels (and we do encourage you to shop around), you do need to pay attention to 2 key aspects of the panel’s quality – GRADE and MANUFACTURER TIER.

GRADE refers to the quality of solar cell used in the solar panel, and are categorized as A, B, C, or D. Grade A cells are the highest quality, in that they are tested against highest quality criteria to ensure there are no micro-cracks in the solar cell, and all the cells are of the same type. The quality diminishes for grade B, which may have micro cracks and not all cells are of the same type (they sometimes mix and match). Grades C and D are much worse quality with larger cracks and chips, and the cell mismatch is even worse.A typical solar cell will be exposed to sunlight throughout its lifetime. Sunlight contains harmful ultraviolet (UV) light that deteriorates all materials, including solar cells. The tiny flaws in the material become worse after prolonged exposure to sunlight, and its power output reduces over time.As a grade A cell has the least flaws to start with, its deterioration will be the slowest.

MANUFACTURER TIER refers to how automated a manufacturer is in its manufacturing process, its manufacturing volume, how long it has been in the industry, and how much it invests in R&D. There are 3 tiers to classify this:

certified engineers installing Jinko Panels in the heart of Ghana capital city,Accra

Tier 1 manufacturers are the top 2% of solar manufacturers, normally producing over 1 GW of solar panels in a year. They are vertically integrated meaning they make their own cells and wafers. They invest heavily in R&D, and have advanced robotic processes for manufacturing. They have been manufacturing panels for longer than 5 years. Tier 2 manufacturers are small to medium scale manufacturers, with little or no investment in R&D. They only use partial robotics in their manufacturing process, and rely more on manual work from human production lines. They have been producing panels for 2 to 5 years. Tier 3 manufacturers are actually just Assemblers – i.e. they assemble other manufacturer’s cells into a panel. This is 90% of the new solar PV companies, with no investment in R&D, and they use human production lines for manual soldering of solar cells instead of advanced robotics. They have been assembling panels for 1-2 years. You get best (and consistent) results from Grade A panels manufactured by a Tier 1 manufacturer. They may cost a little more on a per-watt basis, but when you consider the energy output and the longevity of their panels, you actually get more energy out of Tier 1 / Grade A panels than anyone else. And ultimately, you have to ask yourself what matters to you more — the total number of watts of a solar panel, or the actual kWh (units) of energy produced by the panel?

That’s why we at Nocheski Solar use Grade A solar panels from Tier 1 manufacturers like Jinko Solar, which ensures the best overall value in terms overall electricity output and long-term high quality.Hope this helps you when you compare solar panel prices.Let us know your feedback.All that being said, its  prudent to watch out for unscrupulous industry players  who may be selling counterfeited solar products but that is another whole discussion for another day.

Punjo is not Puna : Not All Solar Panels Are Equal

 

 

 


Should i wait for solar prices to improve in Ghana? As the cost per Kw/h of energy from Electricity company of Ghana (E.C.G) continues to rise each year, many Ghanaians are seeking long-term alternatives to reduce their energy bills. Solar energy is a great alternative to drawing power from the electric grid, and saves homeowners substantially in the long run while also benefiting the environment.solar power prices improve Ghana electricity?

Considering low income levels in Ghana , the question that often comes up is can I afford it ? Should I wait ? That is what most people ask themselves when thinking about whether or not they should switch to solar. But the real question they should be asking themselves is: how soon do I want to start saving money?

A Victron 5kva-2.5kwp solar inverter power system installed by Nocheski solar in Accra-Ghana

Installing solar power on your home is one step further into the renewable energy direction and also one step closer to keeping your wallet full. But is current solar technology good enough to use now or should you wait until newer technology comes out? We’ll answer your question with a more important one: why wait? Why the hesitation when solar can be saving you money right now?

There will always be newer technology and newer versions of everything, from computers to fridges, so you may be hesitant to jump in. But why deny yourself the benefits you can get now by making the switch to solar power? Especially when the technology we already have today will save you money now and in the future. Simply put, you can’t start saving the money that comes from switching to solar until you start using solar technology.

Did you pass on purchasing your smartphone because you knew there would be an even better one next season?  Probably not, because you wanted to use that technology now. Same goes for solar power; and you’ll be saving money, which is something we can all say yes to.The first step is to look for a professional solar power installer in Ghana.

It’s worth it to look into it – especially when all it takes is a quick phone call

Contact our Victron Energy product specialist at Nocheski solar   for exciting deals for staff of reputable organizations in Ghana on 0244 270 092 or 0303 211 743

 


World’s Largest Floating Solar Power Plant Operational in China

China’s renewable energy trajectory took a leap forward with its floating solar power plant, the largest in the world getting operational recently. The power plant is located in the coal-rich city of Huainan in south Anhui province of China. The system is built by Sungrow Power Supply Co. Ltd., a global leading photovoltaic (PV) inverter systems supplier, and the 40MW plant has been effectively linked to China’s grid.

The system is designed to work in high humidity and salt spray environments. Renxian Cao, President of Sungrow said that they were committed to introducing cutting-edge technologies to products and offering better products and solutions to customers.

The floating solar power plants come with an array of advantages, as they don’t focus on using valuable land in already densely populated areas. The water acts as a natural coolant to the system and improves generation while limiting long-term heat induced degradation. The panels facilitate in conserving freshwater supplies by lowering the amount of evaporation. The Huainan floating solar power plant which is facilitated by a lake, was created by rain after the land surrounding it collapsed due to subsidence, a process which occurs due to intensive coal mining operations.

The plants are reportedly easy to work on and the size of the plant can be easily increased by shipping in a new batch of solar panels and connect them to the floating plant. Though, floating solar systems on water may reportedly face the challenge of rust. The systems need to be waterproof and resistant to seepage.World’s Largest Floating Solar Power Plant Operational in China

China is poised to becoming a world leader in the renewables domain and is committed to a greener and sustainable future. Despite the many challenges of pollution, China is actively adopting new systems revolving around renewable energy  sources.

Source: SolarPower.com Editorial Team


Working with the charity Assolidafrica 07, a group of teachers and students from the French High School Iscles Manosque have been to install lighting and electricity; computers and a photocopier, in two remote schools in Burkina Faso.

Burkina Faso is a landlocked African country just north of the equator whose 17 million people are spread out over 100,000 square miles, and whose official language is French. The two remote schools to benefit from this equipment were College de Boulma and College de Kapon (440 students) – separated by an hour’s drive through the bush by car.

 

Being so remote, on arriving the French students confessed that their first thought was ‘What are we doing here? Is this really a school – where donkeys wander in and out, laundry hangs out to dry right there in the grounds, and villagers are pumping water from a well?’ Assolidafrica 07 have been slowly building the schools for five years whilst lessons to classes of up to 100 pupils proceed.

In a project they named ‘Solaire et Solidaire’, as part of their own education the French students, guided by tutors, designed the off-grid Photovoltaic power supply and lighting/electrical systems they would install. Victron provided training and some of the equipment, and the students approached industry themselves for sponsorship …experience which will be invaluable to them later in their own lives.

The project included the installation of high-quality suspended lighting systems, very professionally wired in trunking; fabrication of roof-top mounting system for the Solar Panels; and the technical installation of PV panels cabled to Charge Controllers, Inverters and the Consumer unit (distribution panel/fuse board).

One of the volunteers, Thomas Tsamen commented: We didn’t have all the tools we needed so we figured it out with the means we did have.’ A point which illustrates the double-benefit of this volunteer program; the volunteers learn as they build projects which provide so much benefit for the African Schools. And as for team-building, working outside handling tools and equipment which the sun has heated to 60 degrees has it’s own challenges! They’re harsh conditions in which students and teachers alike quickly learn that diplomacy is the key to the continuance of smooth relations!

Alan Morel and Jean Paul Nabaloum

In traditional African society the Tribal Chiefs are guarantors of customs and habits. They’re the ones who regulate society and decide all matters relating to development and problem-resolution. The chief of Kapon – dressed in the robes of his office – said ‘Studying is what’s going to save us. If we stay ignorant, there is no development …I’m so glad to receive these panels and this equipment which will light our classrooms and help our education.’

The lighting now installed allows the schools to extend their curriculum into the evening. Speaking at the Completion of the work tutor Rasmané Ouedraogo said: ‘I’m speechless really. Students will have light and electricity to study for their diploma. And with the computer equipment we are making a giant step.’ In Burkina Faso, where a Broadband subscription costs more than the average annual salary, fewer than 5% of the population have access to the internet.

The President of the Parents and Teacher association makes the point that the installation takes a big worry away from parents – about how they would afford an electricity supply.

And the principal of the French High School Iscles Manosque, Cyrille Seguin, acknowledging the commitment of both teachers and students who ‘dared’ to bring the project to his attention …and then carry it out, said of his students: They will carry the richness of this experience with them all their lives.

Boulma middle school supervisor Mr. Kabore

Source:victron energy


Pure solar water: Generating Clean Drinking Water from Air

The leapfrog in solar panels technology addresses the global issue of water supply by providing clean, drinkable water. Think about it, we are all surrounded by air, a form of vapour, water’s gaseous, evaporated state. A new form of solar atmospheric water generators attempts to harness the power of the sun and create clean, drinkable water from the air.

The new type of solar panel could turn moisture in the air to clean drinking water and would be a big boon to families in cities like Guayaquil, Ecuador where there are no city pipes. It could save time for the women in sub-Saharan African who spend an estimated 40 billion hours a year collecting water. The clean water generated could eliminate water-borne diseases.

The new solar panels, which are not for retail sale yet, can be installed at home or office. The panels are said to be self-contained and work on a special membrane which can absorb the water molecules. The water is then treated with minerals to add fresh taste and then stored in on-board reservoirs.

What is the underlying premise of creating clean water? The material which is created reportedly can absorb water from the air. What would happen if you leave a bowl of salt open? It would become clumpy due to the moisture. The solar panel works on the same premise, where the water is evaporated to purify it, and further remove pollutants.

The solar panel technology would cost around $2,900, with no installation costs, and produce around ten small water bottles daily, and is expected to last for around ten years. A single panel could reportedly provide cooking water for a family of four inclusive of hospitals or businesses, which can be scaled up with the use of multiple panels.

When are we getting this new technology in Ghana? We dont know for now

 

Source: SolarPower.com Editorial Team